Support us by using the banners our partners.
We invest this back to you and the faucet.

What are Dogecoin?

Dogecoin was created by programmer Billy Markus from Portland, Oregon, who hoped to create a fun cryptocurrency that could reach a broader demographic than Bitcoin.

On December 19, 2013, Dogecoin jumped nearly 300 percent in value in 72 hours, rising from US$0.00026 to $0.00095, with a volume of hundreds of Dogecoins per day. This growth occurred during a time when Bitcoin and many other cryptocurrencies were reeling from China's decision to forbid Chinese banks from investing Chinese Yuan into the Bitcoin economy. Three days later, Dogecoin experienced its first major crash by dropping by 80% due to large mining pools seizing opportunity in exploiting the very little computing power required at the time to mine the coin.

Like Bitcoin and Litecoin, Dogecoin functions using public-key cryptography, in which a user generates a pair of cryptographic keys: one public and one private. Only the private key can decode information encrypted with the public key; therefore the keys' owner can distribute the public key openly without fear that anyone will be able to use it to gain access to the encrypted information. All Dogecoin addresses are public key hashes. Unlike Bitcoin addresses, which are 27 to 33 characters long, Dogecoin addresses are a string of 34 numbers and letters (both upper and lower case), starting with the letter D. A public key is the Dogecoin address to which other users can send Dogecoins. A private key, however, allows full access to the Dogecoin wallet; it must be kept secret and secure.